J Rheum Dis 2019; 26(3): 211-218  
Neuromyositis: A Rare Extramuscular Manifestation of Dermatomyositis
Chan Keol Park, Su-Jin Yoo, In Seol Yoo, Jinhyun Kim, Seung Cheol Shim, Seong Wook Kang
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea
Correspondence to: Seong Wook Kang http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0076-0822
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, 282 Munhwa-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon 35015, Korea. E-mail:kangsw@cnuh.co.kr
Received: December 26, 2018; Revised: February 18, 2019; Accepted: March 7, 2019; Published online: July 1, 2019.
© Korean College of Rheumatology. All rights reserved.

This is a open Access article, which permits unrestricted non-commerical use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) are representative idiopathic inflammatory myopathies characterized by symmetric and progressive proximal muscle weakness. Especially, DM is identified by characteristic skin lesions and has many extramuscular manifestations including various cardiac abnormalities, interstitial lung disease, and malignancy. However, involvement of peripheral nervous system in DM/PM is very rare and less known. The term “Neuromyositis” was introduced by Senator in 1893 to describe the concomitant involvement of the peripheral nervous system in DM/PM. Since then, a very few cases of neuromyositis have been reported mainly in the United States and Europe. Therefore, the pathogenetic mechanism and disease progression are unclear. In recent years, a few more cases were reported in Asia, specifically, China and Japan; however, none in Korea. Here, we describe a case of DM-associated neuromyositis in a 42-year-old man in Korea and review previous publications through literature research.
Keywords: Dermatomyositis, Peripheral nervous system diseases, Nerve conduction, Electromyography


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